As I’m getting more and more used to the Heartbeat (because it is actually a great series), I’m interested in Alex and her personal life as much as medical cases she’s handling. The case they dealt with in “The Inverse” was very interesting and has provided us with some glimpse to the past, when Alex and Jessie did operate together and Millicent was a mousy junior? Does that mean Millicent is younger than Alex? So many questions, bring on the new episode!

CHARACTERS TO WATCH FOR:

  • Alex and Jessie… And Pierce? There’s a triangle and I am not sure I like it, I believe we all want more drama, more emotions and feels. Why is Jessie not fighting for Alex? Why is Alex living a quietly uninteresting love life? Can they have a bit of fighting here and there? We all love Pierce, but it seems like they forgot Jessie and his feeling?

REAL OR NOT RATING: ★★★★  (1 Being the Worst, 5 Being the Best.) 

REAL: How the real world works:

  1. Having patients who have rare disorders – when a lady with a mirrored heart arrived to the hospital it wasn’t clear as she wasn’t wearing the bracelet they are supposed to wear. Only 1 in 10,000 people would ever have a condition like that and not wearing the bracelet doesn’t make you a better person. Luckily, Alex did realize that the patient is special, only because she actually operated on her (10 years ago). But even though this episode is highly concentrated on this patient, it is important to note that people like that normally are in good health.

FAKE: Cringe worthy scenes that would never happen:

  1. Doctors stealing a possible organ donor. Alex being young and ambitious has nothing to do with stealing someone’s body, when the family hasn’t even made up their minds about the donation. I believe that was very unethical. Very. In reality, the family could sue the doctor for such a decision and that wouldn’t go down well. But we all saw how Pierce stepped in to change their minds (what an angel)!
  2. Doctors putting people up for a snooze while arguing. Well, what Alex did was unprofessional and in the real world it is unlikely to happen. You cannot just use the power of having the access to the medication so you could sedate your patient even if he doesn’t agree with your decision.

I'm Ginny, blogging from Manchester, UK. I've been a Biomedical Scientist for 2 years now. I'm a graduate of Manchester Metropolitan University and University of Chester.